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Are Contact Lenses Safe For Young Children?

Here’s a question we often get at our practice: Is my child too young for contact lenses?’ This is an important question, and the answer may surprise you.

For children with myopia (nearsightedness), contact lenses can be a convenient method of vision correction. It allows kids to go about their day without having to worry about breaking or misplacing their glasses, and enables them to freely participate in sports and other physical activities.

Local Contact lens supplier near you in Bardstown, Kentucky

Some children and young teens may ask their parents for contact lenses because they feel self-conscious wearing glasses. Contact lenses may even provide children with the confidence boost they need to come out of their shell. Moreover, these days, it is very popular for children to wear single-use one-day disposable soft contacts, since there is no cleaning or maintenance involved.

Some parents may deny their child’s request for contacts due to concerns about eye health and safety. There’s no reason to worry: contact lenses are just as safe for children as they are for anyone else.

Cecil Family Eyecare Eye Clinic and Eye exam, contact lenses, myopia in Bardstown, Kentucky

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Bardstown eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

At Cecil Family Eyecare, we provide children, teens, and patients of all ages with a wide variety of contact lenses. If you’re concerned about the safety of contacts for your child, we’ll be happy to explain and explore ways to ensure maximum safety, optimal eye health and comfort. To learn more or to schedule a pediatric eye exam for contact lenses, contact us today.

What Are the Risks of Having My Child Wear Contact Lenses?

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A study published in the January 2021 issue of The Journal of Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics found that kids aren’t at a higher risk of experiencing contact lens complications.

The study followed nearly 1000 children aged 8-16 over the course of 1.5-3 years to determine how contact lenses affected their eye health.

The results indicate that age doesn’t have an effect on contact lens safety. In fact, the researchers found that the risk of developing infections or other adverse reactions was less than 1% per year of wear — which is comparable to contact lens wearers of other ages.

But before you decide that contact lenses are right for your child, you may want to consider whether your child is ready to wear them. During his or her eye doctor’s appointment, the optometrist may ask about your child’s level of maturity, responsibility, and personal hygiene. Since many children are highly motivated to wear contacts, they tend to display real maturity in caring for their lenses. That said, in the initial stages, parents may need to play an active role, as their child gets used to inserting and removing the new contact lenses.

It’s important to note that just as with any other medical device, contact lenses are not risk-free. Anyone who wears contact lenses has a chance of developing eye infections or other complications with contact lenses. However, when worn and cared for according to your eye doctor’s instructions, contact lenses are low-risk and perfectly safe for children and teenagers.

So, go ahead and bring your child in for a contact lens consultation! We’ll help determine if your child is ready for contacts and answer any questions you or your child may have. To schedule your child’s contact lens fitting or eye exam, contact Cecil Family Eyecare in Bardstown today.

Call Cecil Family Eyecare on 502-466-7200 to schedule an eye exam with our Bardstown optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Just in case you missed them, here are some of our previous blog posts :

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

Bardstown LASIK – What to Expect After LASIK?

Progressive Myopia: When Your Child’s Vision Keeps Getting Worse

Signs of Eye and Vision Problems in Infants

5 Reasons To Wear Sunglasses In The Fall

When we think of fall accessories, the first things that come to mind are warm sweaters, plush scarves, or a snug pair of boots. Here’s another essential item to add to your list: a good quality pair of UV-blocking sunglasses.

But why is it so important to protect your eyes when the sun seems to be hiding behind clouds on most days? While it may not make much sense, you’ll get a better understanding by the time you finish reading this article. So let’s dive in and explore the 5 reasons you should protect your eyes from the sun in the fall.

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Sunglasses: Summer Vs. Fall

The Sun’s Position

While we may squint more in the summer, the sunlight’s path to the eyes is more direct in the fall as the sun sits closer to the horizon. This places our eyes at greater risk of overexposure to UV rays.

Changing Temperatures

Irritating symptoms like dry, red, or watery eyes are often due to the season’s cool and harsh winds. The colder the air, the stiffer and thicker the eyes’ tear oils (meibum) become. Because thicker meibum doesn’t spread as evenly over the surface of the eyes, the tears can’t offer sufficient protection and moisture.

Minimize irritation by shielding the eyes from cool winds with wraparound sunglasses.

Cecil Family Eyecare Eye Clinic and Sunglasses, Eye Protection and Fall Fashion in Bardstown, Kentucky

Many eye diseases can be quickly and easily diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam. If you were diagnosed with an eye disease, such as Cataracts, Glaucoma, Macular degeneration, Diabetic retinopathy, or Dry eye, you may be overwhelmed by the diagnosis and confused about what happens next. Will you need medications or surgery – now or in the future? Our Bardstown eye doctor has prepared the following answers to your questions about eye disease.

UV Rays

Exposing your eyes to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays is problematic year-round, as it can result in serious eye diseases, such as cataracts and macular degeneration. That’s why it’s important to wear 100% UV-blocking sunglasses anytime you’re outdoors, no matter the season.

Make sure to sport your sunnies even on cloudy days, as up to 90% of UV rays pass through clouds. Furthermore, outdoor objects like concrete and snow reflect a significant amount of UV rays into the eyes.

Fall’s Dangerous Sun Glare

Because the sun is positioned at a lower angle in the fall, it can produce a brutal glare that poses a danger for driving. Rays of light that reflect off of smooth surfaces like the metal of nearby cars can be so bright to the point of blinding the driver.

You can combat this dangerous glare by wearing polarized sunglasses. These lenses reduce the glare’s harmful effects by filtering out horizontal light waves, such as the ones reflected by a shiny car bumper.

Local Sunglasses, Eye Protection and Fall Fashion in Bardstown, Kentucky

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Looking for Sunglasses Near You?

Here’s the bottom line: you need to protect your eyes by wearing sunglasses in the fall and year-round, no matter the season or climate. Investing in a stylish pair of durable, UV-protective sunglasses is — simply-put — a worthwhile investment in your eye health.

So if you’re looking for advice about a new pair of high-quality sunglasses for the fall, with or without prescription lenses, visit Cecil Family Eyecare. If standard sunglass lenses are too dark for you at this time of year, ask us about green or brown tinted lenses; they transmit more light and contrast to the eyes than standard grey tints.

We’ll be happy to help you find that perfect pair to protect your eyes, suit your lifestyle needs and enhance your personal style. To learn more, call 502-466-7200 to contact our Bardstown eye doctor today.

Call Cecil Family Eyecare on 502-466-7200 to schedule an eye exam with our Bardstown optometrist.

Alternatively book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

FOLLOW US


Just in case you missed them, here are some of our previous blog posts :

World Braille Day 2019

Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses

Sports-Related Eye Injuries

Bardstown Eye Clinic – 14 Eye Care Secrets

How Can I Protect My Eyes From Diabetes?

Cecil Family Eyecare - Local Vision Center in Bardstown, Kentucky

Diabetes is becoming much more prevalent around the globe. According to the International Diabetes Federation, approximately 425 million adults were living with diabetes in the year 2017 and 352 million more people were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. By 2045 the number of people diagnosed is expected to rise to 629 million.

Diabetes is a leading cause of blindness as well as heart attacks, stroke, kidney failure, neuropathy (nerve damage) and lower limb amputation. In fact, in 2017, diabetes was implicated in 4 million deaths worldwide. Nevertheless preventing these complications from diabetes is possible with proper treatment, medication, and regular medical screenings as well as improving your diet, physical activity and adopting a healthy lifestyle.

Local Eye Care, Eye Doctors in Bardstown, Kentucky

Contact Lenses in Bardstown

Local Vision Center near you in Bardstown

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What is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a chronic disease in which the hormone insulin is either underproduced or ineffective in its ability to regulate blood sugar. Uncontrolled diabetes leads to hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, which damages many systems in the body such as the blood vessels and the nervous system.

How Does Diabetes Affect The Eyes?

Diabetic eye disease is a group of conditions which are caused, or worsened, by diabetes; including diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, glaucoma, and cataracts. Diabetes increases the risk of cataracts by four times and can increase dryness and reduce cornea sensation.

In diabetic retinopathy, over time, the tiny blood vessels within the eyes become damaged, causing leakage, poor oxygen circulation, then scarring of the sensitive tissue within the retina, which can result in further cell damage and scarring.

The longer you have diabetes, and the longer your blood sugar levels remain uncontrolled, the higher the chances of developing diabetic eye disease. Unlike many other vision-threatening conditions which are more prevalent in older individuals, diabetic eye disease is one of the main causes of vision loss in the younger, working-age population. Unfortunately, these eye conditions can lead to blindness if not caught early and treated. In fact, 2.6% of blindness worldwide is due to diabetes.

Diabetic Retinopathy

As mentioned above, diabetes can result in cumulative damage to the blood vessels in the retina, the light-sensitive tissue located at the back of the eye. This is called diabetic retinopathy.

The retina is responsible for converting the light it receives into visual signals to the optic nerve in the brain. High blood sugar levels can cause the blood vessels in the retina to leak or hemorrhage, causing bleeding and distorting vision. In advanced stages, new blood vessels may begin to grow on the retinal surface causing scarring and further damaging cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy can eventually lead to blindness.

Signs and Symptoms of Diabetic Retinopathy

The early stages of diabetic retinopathy often have no symptoms, which is why it’s vitally important to have frequent diabetic eye exams. As it progresses you may start to notice the following symptoms:

  • Blurred or fluctuating vision or vision loss
  • Floaters (dark spots or strings that appear to float in your visual field)
  • Blind spots
  • Color vision loss

There is no pain associated with diabetic retinopathy to signal any issues. If not controlled, as retinopathy continues it can cause retinal detachment and macular edema, two other serious conditions that threaten vision. Again, there are often NO signs or symptoms until more advanced stages.

A person with diabetes can do their part to control their blood sugar level. Following the physician’s medication plan, as well as diet and exercise recommendations can help slow the progression of diabetic retinopathy.

Retinal Detachment

Scar tissues caused by the breaking and forming of blood vessels in advanced retinopathy can lead to a retinal detachment in which the retina pulls away from the underlying tissue. This condition is a medical emergency and must be treated immediately as it can lead to permanent vision loss. Signs of a retinal detachment include a sudden onset of floaters or flashes in the vision.

Diabetic Macular Edema (DME)

Diabetic macular edema occurs when the macula, a part of the retina responsible for clear central vision, becomes full of fluid (edema). It is a complication of diabetic retinopathy that occurs in about half of patients and causes vision loss.

Treatment for Diabetic Retinopathy and Diabetic Macular Edema

While vision loss from diabetic retinopathy and DME often can’t be restored, with early detection there are some preventative treatments available. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy (when the blood vessels begin to grow abnormally) can be treated by laser surgery, injections or a procedure called vitrectomy in which the vitreous gel in the center of the eye is removed and replaced. This will treat bleeding caused by ruptured blood vessels. DME can be treated with injection therapy, laser surgery or corticosteroids.

Prevent Vision Loss from Diabetes

The best way to prevent vision loss from diabetic eye disease is early detection and treatment. Since there may be no symptoms in the early stages, regular diabetic eye exams are critical for early diagnosis. In fact diabetics are now sometimes monitored by their health insurance to see if they are getting regular eye exams and premium rates can be affected by how regularly the patients get their eyes checked. Keeping diabetes under control through exercise, diet, medication and regular screenings will help to reduce the chances of vision loss and blindness from diabetes.

Call Cecil Family Eyecare at 502-466-7200 in Bardstown, KY to schedule an eye exam with our optometrist.

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

Progressive Frames or LASIK: Which Would You Choose?

senior woman wearing glassesEye doctors today can help most patients who have vision problems stemming from presbyopia. Glasses and laser surgery are both options that are available to correct vision in this circumstance. Each option to correct vision has some advantages and disadvantages.

Progressive Frames

Glasses are an effective and common way to correct most vision problems, including presbyopia. Stylish, sophisticated and funky glasses are available for every occasion and personality.

Advantages:

Glasses are easy to wear, convenient, and comfortable. Progressive eyeglasses have become a common way to treat presbyopia, as you have one pair of glasses for reading, computer work, and distance, as opposed to needing different glasses for near and far vision. The newest lens technology makes lenses light and accurate. A wide selection of coatings for lenses are available, such as anti-reflective coatings, photochromatic coatings, and polarized coatings. Special glasses can be created for those who have special needs for work or sporting events.

Disadvantages:

Glasses without high index lenses that have strong prescriptions can be thick, and heavy, and less comfortable on your face than not wearing glasses. Glasses can fog up in the cold, and lesser quality lenses can have spots that appear blurry.

Laser surgery

Laser surgery has been an available vision correction option for about twenty years. Various procedures are available, and your eye doctor will decide what method is best for you. Generally, patients can see clearly shortly after the procedure. The most important requirement for an optimal procedure is that you are a good candidate for laser surgery to begin with. The surgical procedure is often performed as out-patient surgery, and usually only takes a few minutes.

Advantages:

You will not need glasses after the laser surgery. Modern laser correction procedures correct presbyopia. For people who hate glasses and can’t wear contact lenses, laser surgery can be a great solution. The other requirements for laser surgery are that the eye be fully formed (adults only can have this surgery), your refraction has not changed in two years, and and the cornea needs to be a certain thickness. As long as you use an experienced eye doctor, laser surgery is very low risk.

Disadvantages:

As with any surgery, laser surgery is an invasive procedure, which is performed on a basically healthy eye. Some side effects and complications could include temporarily dry eyes. These symptoms can last up to twelve weeks. Also, it’s possible that the procedure, while successful, won’t completely correct your vision, and you may need to continue to wear glasses.

Still not sure which is best for you, eye glasses or laser surgery? Schedule an appointment with our eye doctor to discuss the options.

Safety and Sports Glasses

Each year, thousands of individuals sustain eye injuries due to sports and other accidents, many causing permanent damage and vision loss. Over 98% of these injuries can be prevented by proper eye protection. Further The National Eye Institute states that when it comes to children, eye injuries are the leading cause of blindness and that most of these injuries are sports-related.

Just like wearing a helmet when riding a bike or swinging a bat, sports safety glasses or goggles should be part of the uniform and equipment of any high impact sport. Not only do sports glasses protect your eyes but they can also improve vision and performance. Similarly, when involved in work or hobbies that pose a danger on the eyes, such as construction, chemical use, or home improvement projects, safety goggles should always be worn.

What are Sports and Safety Glasses or Goggles?

Sports and safety glasses or goggles are specialized, protective eyewear that are made to reduce the risk of eye damage during sports or work that could be dangerous to the eyes. They are typically made from impact resistant and shatterproof materials such as hard plastics and polycarbonates (frames) or polycarbonate or Trivex (lenses) and cover a larger surface area around your eyes for enhanced protection. Depending on the type of glasses and for what sport or activity they are intended, they may have additional features such as UV protection, polarized lenses, scratch resistance or ultra flexibility or coverage.

When it comes to sports, protective eyewear is becoming more of a norm that it was in previous generations with many leagues requiring their use as a prerequisite to play. Whether it is high speed balls, elbows, debris, snow, sun or water, sports glasses come in a variety of options to suit the particular needs of the sport you play.

Many options will come with rubber padding around the frame to improve safety to the area around the eyes and increase comfort, fit and stability.

Prescription Sports and Safety Eyewear

Advances in sports and safety eyewear technology not only allow for enhanced sharpness and color vision but for corrected visual acuity for those with vision impairment. If you wear glasses or contact lenses, chances are most safety glasses are available with prescription lenses, allowing you to see and perform your best under all circumstances. Another option is to wear contact lenses under your safety eye gear.

Look for Fit and Comfort

Especially when it comes to children, comfort and fit are essential for compliance in wearing protective eyewear. Additionally, instead of enhancing performance, glasses that don’t fit will cause a distraction that hurt your ability to play or work at optimal success. Look for frames that are held in place (wraparound frames and bands help with this), don’t slip, don’t press in at the temples or nose and that fit nicely around the eyes. If you plan to wear goggles over your prescription glasses, make sure that you try them on together and that they fit properly and are able to provide full protection with your prescription glasses on. Similarly, if a helmet will be worn, make sure that the glasses fit, snug but not too tight, within the helmet.

With children who grow, it is important to reassess sports glasses each year to make sure they have not gotten too tight or small, otherwise they could be doing more harm than good.

Sunglasses: High Style with High-Level Protection against Skin Cancer and Vision Loss

It’s common knowledge that ultraviolet sun rays are harmful to skin, and too much exposure will put you at a greater risk of skin cancer. This damage begins from a young age, starting with kids who fail to adequately protect their delicate skin from the sun. Kids’ skin is particularly sensitive to sun damage, and the effects are cumulative. Children love to spend time in the shining, bright outdoors. It’s critical to keep them safe while they have fun in the sun. Wearing UV protective sunglasses is one eye-catching, effective way to help prevent skin cancer around the eyes and nose and to keep vision healthy.

Woman Blue SunglassesSunburn, which indicates damaged skin cells, is the most immediate symptom caused by UV rays. Red or blistered skin should serve as a warning sign that your child is being placed at risk for worse problems – as burnt, damaged skin cells are at a much higher risk of becoming cancerous. Some of your child’s most vulnerable skin tissue surrounds the nose and eyes. Sunglasses are a voguish way to save this skin and keep it healthy, supple and soft.

In addition to blocking UV rays from reaching skin, sunglasses act as a barrier over your child’s eye lens. Until about age 10, the lens is clear, which enables more solar rays to penetrate. As kids grow and their visual system develops, the lens becomes more opaque, providing enhanced natural protection. Retinal exposure to UV rays is linked to cataracts and macular degeneration later in life. When you take measures to protect your young child’s eyes, you’re setting the base for healthier vision later on.

When shopping for the ideal sunwear for kids, it’s best to buy sunglasses that block 99-100% of UV rays. Another rule of thumb is that the more skin covered by the sunglasses – the more efficient the protection. Think wraparound designs for high coverage. Kids nowadays are tuned into their own fashion sense and expression. Save yourself loads of time and energy by letting them choose their own trend-setting sunglasses. They’ll look forward to showing off their new style, and soon all their friends will be sporting sunglasses too.

Macular Degeneration: Who is at risk?

There are many risk factors for Macular Degeneration. Some of these risk factors are things that you cannot control, and some are things that you can control.

senior couple at risk for AMDRisk Factors that you can’t control:

Age – Age is a major risk factor for AMD. The disease is most likely to occur after age 60, but it can occur earlier.

Gender – AMD is more common in women than men

Eye Color – AMD is more common in people with blue eyes

Smoking – Research shows that smoking doubles the risk of AMD.

Race – AMD is more common among Caucasians than among African-Americans or Hispanics/Latinos.

Family history and Genetics – People with a family history of AMD are at higher risk. At last count, researchers had identified nearly 20 genes that can affect the risk of developing AMD. Many more genetic risk factors are suspected.

Risk Factors you can control:

Smoking – Smoking increases your risk, especially if AMD runs in your family

Diet – A poor diet, low in antioxidants and high in saturated fats and processed foods.

Obesity – People who are very overweight have a higher risk of AMD.Exercise – A sedentary lifestyle contributes to AMD.

Cholesterol – High cholesterol is bad for your eyes and your heart.Blood Pressure – High blood pressure may be involved in AMD.

Sun Exposure – Ultraviolet and blue light from the sun and electronics can damage the eye.

What Steps Can You Take to Decrease Your Risk for AMD?

nutrition for AMDTo decrease your risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, or to decrease the rate of progression if you already have age-related macular degeneration, here are some actions you can take:

  • Don’t smoke – and if you do smoke, try to stop.Don’t eat packaged, processed foods, as much as possible.Don’t eat artificial fats.
  • Eat real bakery goods, made with real fat – just don’t eat the whole box.
  • Do wear sunglasses, preferably with an amber, brown, or orange tint that blocks blue light.
  • Do eat lots of dark green leafy vegetables. These vegetables – such as kale, spinach, and collards – contain lutein, a substance that neutralizes the free radicals that will otherwise cause damage to the macula. If you are taking Coumadin and can’t eat these vegetables because of the vitamin K in them, you can take a lutein supplement.
  • Do eat lots of omega-3 fatty acids, which are found in fish, fish oil, flaxseeds, and some nuts. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce inflammation.
  • Do control your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.
  • Do exercise regularly and keep your weight down.

Do You Know if Your Child Has Myopia?

Eye Exams Are Necessary to Diagnose, Treat & Control Myopia

Child Girl Brown EyesThere’s a lot of talk nowadays about myopia and “myopia control” as a part of kids’ eye care. Defined simply, myopia refers to nearsightedness – which means that when your child looks at objects in the distance, they appear blurry. At the beginning, kids may not complain about any vision problems, yet parents and teachers may notice them squinting constantly to see the board or anything faraway. This is a warning sign that it’s time for a pediatric eye exam! A comprehensive evaluation of your kid’s vision is the only reliable way to detect or rule out myopia or any vision problem. Additionally, routine eye exams enable early intervention, which goes far towards the eye health and general well-being of your child.

What causes nearsightedness?

Typically, myopia is genetic. (If your family has a history of being nearsighted, you have even more reason to schedule routine eye exams for your kids!) It is characterized by an elongated eyeball, which affects the way light focuses in front of the retina. Myopia often deteriorates throughout childhood and its progression stops by about twenty years old. However, at that time your child may need very strong corrective lenses in order to see clearly.

How is myopia treated?

Eyeglasses have always been the first line of treatment for myopia. However, new research shows that dual-focus contact lenses or orthokeratology may be a better option for vision correction, as they can also decelerate the progression. Many children with myopia find that their vision gets worse with time, and they need a new, more powerful prescription for lenses at every eye exam. Not only does this lead to thicker, unattractive eyeglass lenses, but it is also associated with a higher risk of eye disease in the future, such as cataracts, glaucoma and retinal detachment. Fortunately, that’s where myopia control enters the picture!

What is myopia control?

While there is no way to prevent or cure nearsightedness, various methods show promise for controlling the progression. Orthokeratology, better known as ortho-k, and dual-focus contact lenses are two relatively new ways to put the brakes on myopia.

Dual-focus contacts

The results of a comprehensive three-year long study were shared recently at the British Contact Lens Association Clinical Conference in Liverpool, England. 144 myopic children, aged 8 to 12, participated in this study, and the results showed that wearing dual-focus contact lenses was highly effective in controlling myopia with no side effects reported. These lenses, which have alternating zones for visual correction and treatment, slowed the progression of nearsightedness by 59%!

Ortho-k lenses

Ortho-k, or Corneal Refractive Therapy (CRT) is another option for kids who want to see sharp without wearing eyeglasses or daytime contact lenses. Using advanced digital technology, your child’s eye doctor will map your cornea to custom-design your ortho-k lenses. These specialized lenses are worn only while sleeping, when they gently reshape the cornea to correct refractive error. During the day, your kid will have crystal-clear vision without any eyewear. Because ortho-k lenses mold the cornea and suppress the eyeball from growing further, they also suppress the progression of myopia. Ortho-k has shown tremendous success as a comfortable and safe way to control myopia in kids.

Eye Exams are the First Step towards Treating & Controlling Myopia

Eye exams to check children for myopia are an essential part of responsible family eye care! Don’t wait until your child’s vision condition advances and it is too late to treat it effectively. Maximize your kid’s healthy vision with routine pediatric eye exams – and ask us whether he or she is a good candidate for myopia control!

Keratoconus: Living with the Struggle

Living with Keratoconus has left many individuals searching for an eye care specialist with the right solution for their unique vision needs.

Child with KeratoconusKeratoconus is a condition that can develop in the pre-teen years when the cornea starts to change its shape. Associated with these changes are extreme sensitivity to light or glare, blurry vision (like being unable to view the blackboard), and sudden decreases in vision. To get a better picture of Keratoconus, imagine that the top white surface of an eye having lots of ridges and bumps that would prevent a regular contact lens to rest on and adhere to the eye surface. These surface variations are unique to each individual, where some may be able to get by with contacts or glasses, while for others, hard lenses or scleral lenses are the preferred alternative.

The real challenge for patients with Keratoconus isn’t from a lack of alternatives but the constant change in prescriptions nearly every year. In certain cases of Keratoconus, the changes become so extreme that people turn to Corneal transplants.

For those living with Keratoconus, finding a knowledgeable and reliable optometrist with the latest technology is essential, especially since there are solutions for visual comfort that may come up short. Dr. SO-SO at PRACTICE has been fitting scleral lenses for Keratoconus patients, providing the desired comfort and clarity that’s not found anywhere else. People often visit Dr. SO-SO for a second opinion about their Keratoconus or irregular corneas just to be sure that their current prescription is accurate.

While hybrid contact lenses supply better quality of vision for irregular shaped eyes, the hard components used may not provide comfort for some. Patients could turn to scleral lenses, which are large gas permeable contact lenses that cover the entire corneal surface of the eye, ensuring greater comfort.

Call: 111-222-3333

Fortunately, at PRACTICE, DR-SO-SO provides a variety of specialty contact lens treatments that can be custom tailored for nearly any case of Keratoconus, irregular shaped corneas, or extreme astigmatisms. Through years of experience and a knowledgeable, caring staff, there’s no other optometry practice that has the commitment to expertise, patient care, and consistent, successful outcomes. To receive the best fit possible for your eyes, schedule a consultation with us today.

Workplace Vision Wellness Month

In an effort to educate corporations and their employees on the importance of vision health, including safety tips on how to avoid vision-threatening eye accidents, Prevent Blindness America (PBA) has marked the month of March as Workplace Vision Wellness Month.

The workplace can be a dangerous place for your eyes.

Each day, workers sustain job related eye injuries that require medical attention. Safety experts and doctors believe the two main reasons that workers experience eye injuries is either because they don’t wear anything to protect their eyes or they are using the wrong type of eye protection.

Types of Eye Injuries

Potential eye hazards at work include projectiles such as dust, concrete, metal wood and other particles, chemical splashes and fumes, radiation from visible light, ultraviolet radiation, heat, lasers or infrared and blood borne pathogens such as HIV or Hepatitis from blood and body fluids

High risk occupations for eye injuries include construction, manufacturing, mining, carpentry, auto repair, electrical work, plumbing, welding and maintenance.

Safe Sight on Site

There are four things you can do to protect your eyes from injury:

  1. Know the eye safety dangers at your work.
  2. Reduce your exposure to risks before starting work by using machine guards, work screens or other engineering controls.
  3. Use eye protection that fits properly and provides enough protection for what you are doing.
  4. Keep your safety eyewear in good condition and have it replaced if it becomes damaged.

Protection for your Eyes

Your optometrist can help you evaluate potential eye hazards at work and determine the best type of eye protection for you. Some working conditions include multiple eye hazards and using proper eye protection should take all potential risks into consideration.

If you work with chemicals you should wear goggles, while if you work in an area where there are flying objects or dust, choose safety glasses with side shields.

Working near dangerous radiation when welding, using lasers, or fiber optics requires the use of special-purpose safety glasses, goggles, face shields, or helmets designed specifically for what you will be doing.

Healthy Screen Vision

Working on computers or using mobile and hand held devices can also be dangerous for your eyes. Here are some tips to prevent straining your eyes and visual discomfort when working on a computer or using a hand held device.

Learn the 20-20-20 rule to give your eyes a rest. At least every 20 minutes, take a 20 second break to look at something 20 feet away. If using a hand-held device, increase the font size so you can use it at a distance more comfortable for your eyes. Also try to adjust the brightness of your screen to a comfortable resolution ensuring that it is not too bright or too dim. It is also easier on your eyes if you position your reading material slightly below eye level.